WD-40…Who knew!

There are several things we can’t seem to do without around our home. Our arsenal of things we can’t do without includes things like duct tape, PAM cooking spray, Shout carpet cleaner and…WD-40.

This topic came up because I ran into
this photo that my sister commented about on Facebook. I Googled WD-40 and found a great PDF file about 2000 uses for it on their Web site. You can check it out here. This made me wonder if there were places where I shouldn’t use WD-40. A little more Googling led me to this site.

When I attended the Macworld | iWorld Expo a few weeks ago I found that MacKeeper was one of the sponsors of the event. That set off alarms for me.

There are plenty of cleaning products for your Mac these days. Ads for them seem to pop up everywhere! Some of them are serious threats. Remember MacDefender? It is a Trojan horse.

While MacKeeper gets some good reviews, it is hard to find a Mac professional who has it or any similar product installed on their computer. Google it and you will find lots of users with horror stories. Zeobit, the developer of MacKeeper assures us that the bad press is courtesy of one of its competitors.

I have my own experiences with it on client’s machines. I am not impressed with its effects on their computers, much less the way Zeobit attempts to get it installed on your computer. If you go to their Web site, there are several big download buttons. No where does it tell you what it does or how much it costs. You must dig pretty deep to find the answer. There are several price plans and all offer some version of live support. That is were the trouble really starts. I have gotten a number of calls from clients who were told to do things that they recognized as being dangerous for their computers. Zeobit wants to sell you an extended service plan. They do not tell you who the service techs are or how much training they have had. They also don’t offer any guarantees. One client ended up with some real problems after he installed the program. When he called their geek he was asked to purchase an additional annual plan that cost hundreds of dollars. After he paid it and spent many hours with the tech, his problems got worse and worse. He finally called me and we spent even more hours cleaning up the mess that the software and the geek had made! The ironic part is that before he installed the software, his computer was working very well. The client bought the software because it looked like it could do so many things--things that he really didn’t need to do to his computer at all!

Do I use products like MacKeeper?

Absolutely not! And I don’t use them on any of the family computers that I support. Macs are NOT Windows machines. We do not have registry errors and all those other problems that you hear about. In fact, modern Macs, left to do their own maintenance are usually VERY stable.

So, how do you keep your Mac happy?

  • Keep the desktop reasonably clean.
  • Don’t overfill your hard drive.
  • Make sure you have enough RAM. Today you cannot buy a Mac that has less than 8 GB of RAM.
  • Don’t use the software CD that came with your printer. Instead, use “Print and Scan” in the System Preferences to let your computer tell you what it needs.
  • Run the latest version of the Mac OS that your computer is capable of running.
  • Keep up with OS and software updates.
  • Avoid the temptation to constantly tinker with and tweak the OS. Also avoid software that modifies the operating system
  • Don’t turn you computer off at night, but let it sleep so that it can run its background maintenance tasks.
  • Remember, if you are having a problem, the first thing to do is to RESTART YOUR COMPUTER.
  • Buy AppleCare from Apple when you buy new devices.
  • Plug your computer into a good UPS to keep your power steady and clean.

And remember we are here to lend you a hand if you run into problems that are not covered by AppleCare!

Back to MacKeeper

It is a well-known fact that some bloggers get free hardware and software in exchange for reviews. It can be difficult to write a critical review when someone has been nice enough to give you something for free! A less well-known fact is that some companies actually pay for reviews.

I have not tried to make this blog pay for itself. While I occasionally receive free products at Macworld | iWorld, I have never been given software for the express purpose of writing a review. I do occasional reviews for User Group magazines, but I do not write for any sites that pay their writers. I have friends who have been offered money for writing reviews. I have read their reviews for products that I like and I know that my review would be just as positive. However I always feel squeamish when I read their positive review of a product that I find lacking.

In the case of MacKeeper, there are a number of very positive reviews of their product. Interestingly, if the writer allows feedback, most of those reviews contain negative comments regarding both MacKeeper and of the review itself. I have looked through many reviews and there are two sites that I think might be worthwhile for you to read. The
first is from The MacFeed. Sadly, that site closed its doors in the middle of 2012. They are missed. However, they have kept their previous work online. The second is from Thomas’ Tech Corner. His blog is primarily focused on Mac security, so the anti-virus portion of MacKeeper is of the most interest to him. If you read either of these sites, be sure to read the comments as well.

There will always be lots of software that supposedly cleans something on your Mac to make it run better or faster. They even sell some of it in the Apple App Store. But do you really need it or is it an effort to give you something to do with your computer besides create neat stuff and connect with people?

The older, long time Apple users among us grew up having to tweak things to keep their computer going. Apple began changing that when it introduced Mac OS X. We are now at 10.8. Apple has had lots of time to get it “right” and they have accomplished it! Gone are the days filled with frantic phone calls because someone’s Mac won’t work. While we get a few of those calls, most are remedied with a quick reminder to restart your Mac before giving us a call.

If you hear about a fix-it-all product, be a bit wary. Google it and read lots of reviews and the comments made by other readers. Make sure it really does what you need and expect it to do.

--Pat
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